mMARCH Core Sites

The major research goals of GEB are to conduct studies of families to identify aspects of mental disorders that are inherited and to determine the reasons why mood and anxiety disorders may exist in association with other mental disorders (e.g., alcoholism, substance abuse) and medical disorders (migraine). There has been converging evidence that disturbances in circadian rhythms may underlie Bipolar Disorder, and that motor activity could play a major role in its diagnosis and treatment. Our current family study consists of a community sample of 500+ adult probands, including 150 with Bipolar Disorder, 200 with Major Depression, and 150 Other/Controls as well as 1500+ relatives. We have concurrently collected wrist-worn actigraphy and ecological momentary assessment data over a two-week period from 400+ subjects (Philips Actiwatch=330, GENEActiv=100), all of whom have also been evaluated at the NIH clinical center. Future goals include establishing a collaborative, interdisciplinary work group with experts in translational animal research at the NIMH to elucidate the genetic, biologic, and environmental influences on activity and provide insight into potential targets for intervention. Our group is led by senior principal investigator and branch chief Dr. Kathleen Ries Merikangas, working in close collaboration with biostatisticians Dr. Vadim Zipunnikov from Johns Hopkins University and Dr. Haochang Shou from the University of Pennsylvania for methodological and analytical support.

 

Key People: Martin Priesig, Marie-Pierre Strippoli, Cedric Gubelmann, Peter Vollenweider, Pedro Marques-Vidal, Jennifer Glaus
Study Names: Lausanne Geneva Mood cohort, CoLaus/PsyCoLaus
For Lausanne Geneva Mood cohort:

  • Sample: Community, inpatient clinic, outpatient clinic n=1500
  • Study Design: longitudinal
  • Age Range: 4-65
  • Study Aim: To establish association between activity and mood states
  • Key independent variables: mood, cardiovascular
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, Sleep patterns, exercise
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: yes, for 7 days
  • Actigraphy device: GENEActiv
For CoLaus/PsyCoLaus:
  • Sample: community n=3000, target n=4500
  • Study Design: cohort study
  • Age Range: 45-85
  • Study Aim: Exploring mechanisms associated with the beneficial effect of physical activity and the negative effects of sedentary behavior.
  • Key independent variables: mood, cardiovascular
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, exercise, sedentary behavior
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: yes, for 7 days
  • Actigraphy device: GENEActiv

 

  • Key People: Femke Lamers, Brenda Penninx
  • Study Name: Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA, www.nesda.nl)
  • Sample: Community, primary care, outpatient clinic, target n=400
  • Study Design: longitudinal cohort study
  • Age Range: 18-65 at baseline
  • Study Aim: Associations between depressive and anxiety disorders and objective estimates of sleep, activity, and circadian patterns, using standard actigraphy variables as well as applying functional data analysis
  • Key independent variables: depressive disorder, anxiety disorder
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, Sleep patterns, exercise
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: yes
  • Actigraphy device: GENEActiv

 

  • Key People: Jihui Zhang, Yun-Kwok Wing, Hongliang Feng
  • Study Names: The Hong Kong family study of bipolar disorder I
For Greater Bay Area bipolar offspring cohort
  • Sample: Outpatient clinic to recruit patients with bipolar disorders, their spouses and offspring (n= 500 case offspring and 500 control offspring)
  • Study Design: case-control family study and longitudinal follow-up
  • Age Range: 6-21
  • Study Aim: To determine the differences in circadian rhythm dysregulation (physical activity and hormones) between adolescent offspring of patients with and without bipolar I disorder
  • Key Independent Variables: Mood, Sleep, Circadian Rhythm, and MRI
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, Sleep patterns, Exercise
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: EMA: smartphone worn by the participants during 7 days when wearing actimetry.
  • MRI scan
  • Neurocognitive tests
  • Actigraphy device: GENEActiv

 

  • Key People: Ian Hickie, Joanne Carpenter
  • Study Name: BMC Youth Mental Health Follow Up Study
  • Sample: Outpatient clinic n=578
  • Study Design: observational
  • Age Range: 16-30
  • Study Aim: The study aims to characterise sleep and circadian activity rhythms using actigraphy in young people presenting for mental health care (primarily mood disorders). Actigraphy is also collected at more than one time point in a subset of individuals to examine changes 1-5 years later, and the relationship of these changes to clinical and other outcomes. In addition, a further subset (n=52) have participated in clinical intervention studies with short term actigraphy follow up (eg. 3 months).
  • Key independent variables: Mood, Sleep
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, Sleep patterns, skin temperature rhythm
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: Yes- questionnaire including self-report of psychiatric symptoms, and chronotype.
  • Actigraphy device: GeneActiv, Actiwatch

 

  • Key People: Ian Hickie, Nick Martin, Margie Wright, Kerry McAloney, Joanne Carpenter
  • Study Name: Young and Well - 16UP
  • Sample: QIMR twin sample n=640, target n=800
  • Study Design:
  • Age Range: 12-16
  • Study Aim: For 2 weeks, in their home and/or work environment (i.e. not in the laboratory), 300 16 year old twins will wear a wrist activity monitor that measures their circadian rhythm and skin temperature of their wrist. They will also complete a daily sleep diary. Sleep diaries will include reports of bedtime, wake time, and estimated sleep onset time. We will provide feedback to the twins on their sleep-wake patterns over the two week period. This feedback component will be used as a first step toward merging the sleep measures into a behavioural index that ultimately will help individuals, and researchers/clinicians, to track how they are doing in real time, as well as trigger contact or interventions when certain cautionary patterns emerge.
  • Key independent variables: Stress, Sleep
  • Actigraphy variables and outcomes of interest: Physical activity, Sleep patterns
  • Questionnaire or smartphone EMA: Yes- Sleep diary, stress questionnaires, online questionnaire (not necessarily the same time as actigraphy) which includes modules on: general health and wellbeing; education; lifetime experiences (including anxiety, phobias and disorders); depression; suicidality; substance use; personality; circadian rhythms; physical health and activity; eating behaviours; social networking and relationships; and social media use.
  • Actigraphy device: GeneActiv, ActiGraph